Archives for category: Irish Crochet

I always seem to be “a day late and a dollar short” when it comes to holiday themed posts. I know that St. Patrick’s Day is on March 17th, but I think I’m going to take a pass this year for posting wondrous Irish things. If you have an insatiable desire to see these lace beauties, please refer to a previous post of mine here.

Lately I’ve been working on an afghan that’s almost complete (yes, really!) and the Metro Kerchief by Yuliya Tkacheva (see pic below). I love the design of this kerchief, although if you make it slightly larger it would really be a shawlette, and I’m about halfway done. I know, I know – I’m supposed to be designing my own items – but sometimes it’s nice just to go with someone else’s pattern. If I don’t find someone to give this to I’ll probably just list it in my shop.

Metro Kerchief

Metro Kerchief by Yuliya Tkacheva

But I digress. Easter is coming, and I think I’ve been looking at this adorable bunny for so long that I must make her. There is no designer listed that I can find, but the free pattern is available at Amigurumi Today. If you are a Pinterest Peruser, I’m sure you’ve come across her – along with a million other items we all would like to make. Well, enough with the talking. I’ve got the yarn – I’ve got the hook – now wish me luck!

Amigurumi Bunny

Bunny

PS. I want the pattern for that little bear, too!

I couldn’t resist the allure of Irish Crochet Lace for this most wonderful of Irish holidays, St. Paddy’s Day!

Paraphrased from Wikipedia, “Irish crochet” was originally developed in mid-nineteenth century Ireland as a method of imitating expensive Venetian point laces. Irish crochet lace is characterized by separately crocheted motifs, which were then assembled into a mesh background.

This lace is made with a very fine steel crochet hook and fine crochet cotton or linen thread. It begins with an outline of the pattern on a piece of cloth. Each motif is then crocheted separately, using cotton cord for volume and shaping. The finished motifs are then basted (sewn with a loose stitch for temporary tacking) onto a cloth in the shape of the pattern. The motifs are then joined using chains and picots. When all the motifs have been joined together forming one piece of lace the basting stitch is removed from the back cloth revealing the completed lace.

I’ve gathered the following examples of Irish lace from Pinterest, all coming from Russian sites. However, I did find a wonderful Facebook group called Irish Crochet Lab that is run by Larisa Chilton, who is an instructor and has developed an online course for those who want to learn Traditional and Modern Irish crochet lace. You can find Ms. Chilton’s site at https://www.facebook.com/videotutorialsandpatterns/ . Enjoy!

Irish Crochet 2

From postila.ru

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irish crochet 3

From postila.ru, a type of Pinterest

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irish crochet 6

https://www.livemaster.ru/item/17305403-odezhda-vintazhnyj-kaftan-suvenir

Irish crochet 5

http://www.facebook.com/Asia-Verte

Irish crochet 7

http://www.facebook.com/Asia-Verten

Oh, yes, just one more thing. Today is my brother-in-law’s birthday – Happy Birthday, Craig!

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